Investment Showcase

Arjuni International, Ltd.

Human trafficking is one of the social problem in Cambodia. According to UNIAP: Cambodia Review, many women are trafficked for sexual and labour exploitation in different countries such as Malaysia and Thailand. It is estimated that approximately 80 percent of victims are women and girls. Women's dignity is lost and their lives are tough. Ms. Janice Wilson concerns about the humanity of Cambodia very much and she wants to start a business with social purpose. Among different business types, she recognizes that there is potential to develop human hair extensions business in Cambodia. Indeed, this business has been developed in India for years. India has long provided much of the world's natural hair and sold to wholesalers mainly in China, which in turn marketed their products to retailers in Europe and the United States. Ms. Janice Wilson found that Cambodians have superb hair quality, long with cuticles in alignment. With such potential, together with the mission of fighting against human trafficking, Ms. Wilson set up Arjuni International. (Read the full article)
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CiYuan

In China, economic growth is perpetuating a multitude of challenges, including a lack of human rights protection for miGrant workers, environmental degradation, and income disparity-and government is not fully able to address these issues. There is an opportunity for civil society to fill these gaps, but without private sector help in strengthening the country's nascent nonprofit sector, that progress has dramatically less potential. (Read the full article)
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Women In Factories China Program

Manufacturing is an important secondary industry in China's economy. Around 60 percent of workers in the sector are women, making up the bulk of the labour force. Apart from facing challenges such as lower labour costs from overseas competition, businesses face high worker turnover, low productivity, and limited job training and career development opportunities for women. Empowering women workers through programs such as Women in Factories is one way factories and brands can overcome these challenges. This project helps women workers develop their vocational skills and capacity to build their confidence and leadership and management skills to ultimately support arouse their potential and grow their careers. (Read the full article)
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Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS)

Having quality and comprehensive medical service is vital for the well-being of citizens. However, many Indians, especially those who live under poverty line, do not have chance to get proper medical care. World Health Statistics even estimated that India ranks among the lowest in hospital beds 0.7 per 1, 000 population. With the aim of providing world-class healthcare services at affordable costs in India, KIMS Group has started providing medical services since 1996. In 2004, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS) was established as a leading group of multispecialty hospitals in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. (Read the full article)
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Medica Synergie

Medica currently serves the Eastern India region, which has a population base of over 315 million people. The region is endowed with over 40% of India's mineral resources, and increased industrialization has led to improvement in the region's economic situation as well as a greater requirement for access to high quality medical services. (Read the full article)
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HealthCare Global Enterprises (HCG)

Nearly one million Indians die every year due to inadequate healthcare facilities. With inadequate budgetary support, most state governments in India are finding it increasingly difficult to expand their public health facilities to cater to the healthcare needs of their growing population. As a result, it is estimated that around 700 million people have no access to specialist care. Cancer care is one of the specialist care services that are inadequate in India. While the state governments cannot provide such medical service, the social sector tries to fill this gap. With the belief that cancer patients could live longer and have better lives if having quality medical care, HealthCare Global Enterprises specifically provides cancer care and eventually becomes a leader in cancer care in India. (Read the full article)
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Aflatoun Experiential Learning Centre

Current education system in China does not put an emphasis on social and financial education. This results in lacking education platform for children to learn financial concept and have all-round development. This urges Be Better to establish an education platform for the well-being of children. (Read the full article)
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Agent Penny

There lacks social and financial education in nowadays China. Many children neither have proper money management concept nor financial skills, especially those who are living in poor rural areas. Such poor knowledge makes these children hard to change their lives and have a sustainable, all-round development. With the vision of "Economic citizenship education for all", Be Better targets disadvantaged children and is committed to design innovative as well as interactive financial education programs for them. (Read the full article)
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Aflatoun

Typical Chinese education has a strong focus on academic achievement. As a result, social and financial education has been overlooked. However, financial literacy is an important life skill. If children know how to make a budget plan, plan their spending and save money wisely, they can make a change of their lives and can have a better plan for their future. Aflatoun thus is designed to give the children a new learning experience and a chance to learn new skills. Not only does this program teach social and financial skills, this program would bring happiness and encourage active student participation in the classroom. Children could learn by doing real things and they themselves are in charge during Aflatoun classes. (Read the full article)
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Aflateen

Education is the first and foremost component that helps children have personal growth and advancement. However, in China, children from low- and middle-income families, miGrant children and left behind children in rural areas are hard to get education opportunities due to lack of money and resources. For the well-being of these children, it is important to find ways to empower them. Be Better thus focuses on offering education chance to these children. Its programs emphasize financial and social education. All programs combine knowledge, life skills, creative tools and group work for the biggest impact. (Read the full article)
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Carrot Farm

According to the report done by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, a fifth of China's farmland is polluted and pollutants in more than 16% of Chinese soil exceeds national standards. Not only does soil pollution definitely pose adverse effects on public health and food production, it also hinders sustainable development. The mission of Carrot Farm is to live in harmony with the nature, respect nature and land resources, establish healthy, sustainable production and consumption of agricultural products. (Read the full article)
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Hanchao

Water sources in China are amongst the most polluted in the world. According to the World Bank study, 13 of the 15 major cities along the 7 main water source rivers in China are affected by severely polluted water. The most common pollutants in drinking water are high levels of bacteria and toxic heavy metals. To kill the bacteria, Chinese departments of water works simply use more chlorine. However, chlorine present in the water will undergo a variety of reactions with organic matter. Some of those reactions will lead to the formation of undesirable byproducts, some of which have been proven by epidemiological studies to increase the risk of cancer. Apart from chlorine, secondary contamination also makes the water quality worse. For the sake of citizens' health, more efforts are needed to avoid water contamination. (Read the full article)
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Green Creek

While China has a rapid development in the past two to three decades, giving high priority of economic development has led to enormous pressure on the environment in the form of air pollution, water pollution and environmental degradation. Public health, safety and livelihoods are seriously affected. Though the public concern about local environmental issues, the absence of information and knowledge make them only have vague concept about environmental protection and sustainable development. Because of that, the public nowadays do not have enough involvement in environmental protection. They also have low commitment to fulfill their responsibilities. This aggravates the difficulty of green development in China. With the aim of promoting green lifestyle in China, Green Creek thus launches citizens' planting program. (Read the full article)
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Green Earth

Many cities are facing a mounting waste problem. Waste pollutes the environment and takes up precious land resources. However, waste is actually a misplaced resource but nowadays there is a lack of systematic solution for sorting and reusing it. (Read the full article)
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Thailand’s Community Weather Forecast Centre

Daily forecasting by the Meteorological Department of Thailand is frequently inaccurate. There can be a fierce storm with little warning and the department might not give any detail on the area likely to be affected. This makes it hard for the farmers to estimate when is suitable for them to start rice planting and make long-term agricultural plans. This problem deteriorates when the climate have changed drastically. Farmers no longer can follow their normal practice. For example, according to a 65-year-old farmer, the rain used to come around the same time every year for as long as he remembered. But in the past decades, the weather has become so erratic and he suffers a lot. Therefore, a more advanced climate forecast centre is needed in order to improve the farmers' lives. (Read the full article)
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Scale up Women Leadership and Market Development in Deep South of Thailand

Food security and poverty are two main issues in the Deep South of Thailand. Women's livelihoods have been affected by the unrest and low food security. Low skills and few job opportunities force them to live in poverty. In response to the urgent need to increase food security and income, Oxfam GB Asia is working with the Unilever Foundation in Thailand and Deep South Coordination Centre (DSCC) of Prince of Songkhla University to launch this project. (Read the full article)
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Sonova Institute

There is a growing interest in social entrepreneurship especially among the youth, but there exists very limited knowledge, skills, incubation, network and recognition support. What is more, there lacks innovation training for youth in Hong Kong. This limits the development of social entrepreneurship, as it is believed that high-impact innovations can inspire new minds, create new social capital and perpetuate the spiral model of social innovation. In order to develop and maintain the ecosystem of the social entrepreneurship, there is a need to bring together the leaders in business, academia and the social sector to design and deliver a range of programs that nurture news leaders of social innovation in Hong Kong. (Read the full article)
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Milaap Social Ventures

At Milaap, we believe in turning the challenge of running a country of 1.2 Billion people, into an opportunity to empower lives for generations to come. Our on-the-ground network reaches disadvantaged communities across 11 Indian states to help empower 1000s of deserving youth, women and small business owners. (Read the full article)
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Shangri-la Farms

Shangri-la is one of the 73 poorest counties in Yunnan Province, with an average annual household income of $2,623.
Because of lack of market access and bargaining power, villagers in Shangri-la County have to bear the below-the-market price offering and thus unable to sustain the families by selling coffee and honey.

(Read the full article)
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B2R Technologies Pvt. Ltd.

Agriculture is unable to provide adequate means of income to predominantly rural populations in the hill regions of North India. Alternative long-term and stable livelihood options for youth of these regions are non-existent or limited to unorganized tourism. This results in rampant migration to nearby cities like Delhi or Dehradun, where youth are employed in low-value, low paying jobs that offer low savings opportunity and add little to their skills profile. (Read the full article)
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InOpen

Social issues in education, child care and other related fields in emerging Asian countries and Japan. (Read the full article)
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Sun-eee

90% of people in rural Cambodia do not have access to electricity. Only the two main metropolitan regions are served by the national grid. The rest of the country is served by ~290 independent power producers-each operating within a small licensed area. The country also has among the highest electricity tariffs in the region due to its heavy reliance on expensive and dirty diesel power. As such, there is significant opportunity for distributed generation using renewable energy sources. (Read the full article)
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Naya Jeevan Health Plan for Corporate Value Chains

In Pakistan, at least two-thirds of the 180 million-strong population earns less than $3 a day. An estimated 95 million working poor are concentrated in five sectors within the formal economy: corporate, academic, public, SME and NGO and a large informal economy which includes farmers and domestic household staff such as drivers, cooks, maids, guards, etc and their families. (Read the full article)
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Asia Pacific Hospice Network

In Asia's developing countries, the need for palliative care is urgent. It is in these countries that 80 percent of cancers are diagnosed at the incurable stage, compared with 60 percent in developed countries. Very few hospitals in these countries have specialized palliative care units and trained doctors and medical staff to manage them. (Read the full article)
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Hapticus

Mobility-impaired commuters often find it difficult to commute using the available transportation means available because the existing means do not provide adequate facilities that fit the needs of the mobility-impaired. Hence they have a high dependency on family members and need to book transportation days in advance, making it inflexible for them. " (Read the full article)
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Rags2Riches (R2R)

The Philippines generate approximately 18'000 tons of waste daily. 33% of all Filipino households live below the national poverty line. Members of poor and indigenous communities, especially women, have difficulty earning sustainable livelihoods from their community-made products due to lack of market access, consumer demand, product development, and personal/skills training. (Read the full article)
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Spice Connect

People with mental or physical disability are usually being marginalized and they could not receive enough care and support from the society. It is very hard for them to find jobs and many of them encounter personal problems as well as family problems. With the belief that working in a supportive and friendly environment is the best form of therapy towards self-reliance and confidence, Spice Connect helps the disabilities through providing job opportunities to them. (Read the full article)
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Inle Hospitality Vocational Training School

Myanmar is just beginning to open up through its reform process. The Inle Lake area of Shan state is an area that is confronted with multiple challenges related to pollution, deforestation and increased land-grabbing. Furthermore, reforms and opening up in Myanmar mean that the area will also soon see an inflow of tourists. A sustainable form of tourism will go a long way in saving the lake and preserving the ecosystem in the area, apart from allowing diversification in the economy and generating higher revenues. (Read the full article)
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Vocational School

The lack of education and vocational training opportunities in Myanmar pose a major challenge to improving livelihoods of the Burmese. Capacity-building and command structures in public institutions need to be urgently undertaken.

(Read the full article)
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Aangan – Shakti

While there are schools, hospitals and services in close physical proximity, children are unable to access these services because of poverty, caste, discrimination, work or gender. India's urban population (currently 30%) includes 93 million who live informal settlements (Government data 2011). In the struggle for survival or security and children are often pushed into dangerous work or other exploitative situations. What's more the chronic violence and exclusion of life in urban settlements also impacts children adversely. (Read the full article)
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Sahyog Umang

In the last decade, policymakers and government and non-government institutions have made a concerted effort to promote the education of the girl child. This has resulted in parents increasingly supporting their daughters' enrollment up to higher secondary education. In urban low-income communities, girls from disadvantaged backgrounds who have struggled to reach secondary and higher secondary education, often lack confidence and opportunities as young women to acquire personal and professional skills that can empower them socially and economically. (Read the full article)
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Yayasan Kopernik

Simple technologies like solar lights, water filters and clean cookstoves can make life easier for billions of people who lack access to basic infrastructure, but these technologies are not reaching the people who need them the most. Communities in the last mile -- the most remote parts of the developing world -- are often the last to gain access to life-changing technology. If these products do reach them, people have to pay a much higher price for them compared to more accessible locations. Establishing reliable supply chains to connect simple, affordable, life-changing technology with last mile communities is a major challenge throughout the developing world. (Read the full article)
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Shoshit Seva Sangh

The children belong to a community in Bihar called the musahar or the rat eater community. Members of this community are mostly landless labourers living in abysmal poverty for centuries. The literacy level in the community is less than 3%, and education is a distant dream.

(Read the full article)
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Varthana

More than 100 million Indian children attend low cost private schools that have access to little or no funding from traditional financial or micro-finance institutions. They also receive very little other support, having an impact on the quality of education on offer and constraining the growth of affordable private schools. (Read the full article)
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Turquoise Mountain Trust

Decades of conflict have undermined Afghanistan's unique traditions of Islamic art and architecture. Many of the historic structures that survived are now under threat from developers, as are the incomes that support Afghanistan's hundreds of thousands of crafts people. The old town of Kabul was once renown for its rich cultural heritage of traditional architecture and crafts. However, until recently the whole area was buried under two metres of garbage, had no running water, drainage or electricity, and its houses and historic buildings were in ruins. (Read the full article)
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Drishti Eye Care

As per National Programme for Control of Blindness (NPCB), 1% of population in India has avoidable blindness - this is close to 25% of blindness cases worldwide. This number is increasing at the rate of 0.5% each year and threatens to double the backlog by 2020 unless if there is a substantial increase in cataract surgical rates. Over 80% of people above the age of 50 need some form of eye care but there are usually no providers in their local area (especially in rural India). While 72% of India's population lives in rural areas over 90% of our Ophthalmologists are in urban areas. (Read the full article)
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Xingeng Workshop

Infected inhabitants of Henan HIV Victim Village had been illegally producing fireworks and firecrackers in order to make quick cash. Physically- and mentally-challenged people lack of skills and chances to get employed to show their social value. How to earn money legitimately despite the fact that they lacked certain knowledge and vocational skills was a great challenge faced by the society. Employment is the key for challenged people to gain independence and realize their social value, yet is a long-term challenge. Those people all have to find the way out of the plight. A medium sized coffee will produce nearly 20 grams of coffee grounds to make one fresh coffee. It is estimated that there are over 600 coffee shops in shanghai, including both franchised and local ones. Besides, large numbers of corporate provide fresh coffee for staff as well. All these contribute to a large consumption of coffee and an immense amount of coffee grounds, hundreds of tons. (Read the full article)
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Table for Two Hong Kong

There is a global food imbalance: on the one hand, there are rising levels of obesity, diabetes and over-nutrition in developed countries, whilst on the other hand, hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. The awareness around food problems is low. (Read the full article)
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Playtao Education

Amongst the 1.02 million people living under the poverty line in Hong Kong (as of 2012), 209,000 are children under 18. In other words, 1 out of 5 of Hong Kong's impoverished population comprise of children. Although Government has extended free education to 12 years, the learning needs of children in poverty are hugely unmet, causing serious education inequality in Hong Kong society. These children have little or no access to extra-curricular development in an increasingly competitive society, which will disadvantage them in their applications to university and jobs. Parents are seriously affected as well. Because they have to look after their children after school, parents are also unable to find full-time employment, which leads to a further downward spiraling into a cycle of poverty. (Read the full article)
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Light be

Soaring property prices have given Hong Kong the No. 1 title of unaffordable housing in the world across 360 cities. It is estimated around 170,000 people in Hong Kong are living in cramped subdivided flats, cubicle apartments and even cage homes. It is needed to help these disadvantaged groups improve their living condition by providing affordable and hygienic flat. (Read the full article)
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Green Monday

Hong Kong has the second highest carbon footprint per capita of any country in the world. Much of this comes from the production and transportation of imported goods - including livestock - while only 17% is from domestic activities. What is more, beef consumption per capita in Hong Kong is one of the highest in the world. It is almost double the rate of beef consumption in the EU and seven times as much as Mainland China. If everyone in Hong Kong gives up meat one day a week, it would be like taking 86,000 cars off the road and a person can reduce his or her carbon emissions by 28.5%. (Read the full article)
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Diamond Cab

In Hong Kong, there are about 160,000 people with physical disabilities and 900,000 elderly, of which over 100,000 are estimated to be wheelchair users. People with disabilities in Hong Kong have few options for travelling around the city. Most wheelchair users rely on makeshift vans with poor hygiene, no insurance protection and, most importantly, are illegal. (Read the full article)
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SMV Wheels

SMV Wheels provides rickshaw pullers with an asset (cycle rickshaws, trolleys and push cars) on a deferred payment basis. By aggregating demand, SMV Wheels is able to better represent rickshaw pullers and provide them with licenses, insurance policies and maintenance facilities. Challenges: Financing: Difficulty in raising start-up working capital to pay for the upfront costs of the rickshaws, as all investors and banks want to see a proven track record prior to investment Communications: Difficulty in communicating the financial model and overall business plan of the organization, leading to a delay in the due diligence process and in term sheet negotiations " (Read the full article)
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SABRAS

SABRAS provides services to small salt producers including procurement, processing & marketing of salt, providing small scale producers with innovative solar pumps to reduce high diesel costs and the hardships of salt production while increasing salt producers' income Human Resources: Sabras has found it very challenging to attract employees who have a combination of business skills and development expertise, especially when the job requires working in the harsh conditions of the salt plains Raising capital: Investors pushed for SABRAS to hire a COO who could concentrate on the operations and scaling of the organization, prior to investment (Read the full article)
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Operation Asha

Tuberculosis (TB) claims one life every 90 seconds in India, where 3.5 million of the world's 13 million TB patients live. TB is associated with a social stigma: children drop out of school due to their own or their parents' infection, while 100'000 women are abandoned by their families every year. Although easily treatable with limited resources, a scarcity of reachable treatment centers results in high default rates, causing relapse and increased drug resistance. (Read the full article)
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Husk Power Systems

Approximately 480 million people in India across 125'000 villages (44.5% of the population) do not have reliable access to electricity. Indian government has designated 18'000 villages as "economically impossible" to reach via conventional means of grid electrification. Current power options such as kerosene lanterns or diesel generators are uneconomical, inefficient and environmentally unfriendly. (Read the full article)
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Green Oil

Over 36% or 120 hectares of geographic area of India classified as wastelands. An estimated 300 million people country-wide, and 15 million in Rajasthan alone are affected by wastelands. There is a lack of long-term livelihood opportunities for people around wastelands, further exacerbated by lack of electricity. (Read the full article)
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Driptech

Today, over 600 million poor farmers in the developing world lack sufficient irrigation water and thus require solutions to use the available water more efficiently. Because of smaller farm sizes and little access to financing, these farmers cannot afford current water-saving drip irrigation systems, which are mainly designed for large farms. As a result, these farmers struggle to produce crops during the dry season and remain trapped in poverty. (Read the full article)
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Jugnuu

Based on recent studies, the Right to Education (RTE) Act in India has succeeded in establishing high enrollment rates in schools. However, a large shortcoming exists where elementary school students from middle to low income households have failed to meet the minimum standards of reading and writing in English. The reasons for this are: 1) No failure policy of the RTE Act. Students progress in school despite not attaining the necessary level of competency in subjects. 2) Shortage of qualified, dedicated teachers 3) Lack of out-of-school learning options for students. Generally, they switch to their dialect at home, rarely practicing how to speak in the English language. (Read the full article)
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Society Staples

Fitness has been playing a larger than usual role in recent years with a growing 2.6 million gym users in Singapore for year 2012, more than double since 2006. However, the number of disadvantaged groups leading an active lifestyle is exceedingly low. This is attributed to non-existent inclusive fitness facilities and programs. For example, out of 250,000 Persons With Disabilities (PWDs), only a fraction is leading an active lifestyle. For the elderly, aged 65 to 69, only 5% are exercising on a regular basis. This figure further drops to 1% for those aged 75 and above. Yet, multiple research and studies have proven that sports bring about numerous psychological and physical benefits to individuals. The founders, Ryan Ng and Debra Lam, tested this concept themselves by setting up and personally training Deaf Dragons, Singapore's first and only full deaf dragon boat team. Throughout the span of 2 years, the Deaf paddlers not only reaped the benefits of sports but the team also altered society's mindsets towards PWDs with their podium finishes in local and international races. Sports was then seen as an effective platform to bridge the gap between disadvantaged groups and the larger community, transforming Singapore into a more inclusive society. Unfortunately, the impact of Deaf Dragons was confined within the boundaries of the dragon boat fraternity. Wanting to further expand and replicate the impact of Deaf Dragons and reach out to more disadvantaged groups, the founders came up with another idea. At the same time, the demand for functional training and boutique gyms are also increasingly gaining popularity in Singapore with more customers looking for specialized, intimate fitness centers that forgo cookie-cutter programs and services. (Read the full article)
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Solar Bathrooms Project – Qinghai Province

Qinghai Province in China is an area of great need. Villages in the area have no access to hot water or bathing facilities therefore villagers’ health suffers as a result of poor personal hygiene. Started from five Tibetan Chinese villages with a total population of 2,000+, Village People Project (VPP)'s partner-Lotus Charity has already implemented similar schemes in 8 other villages since 2013. (Read the full article)
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3.2.1 Education Foundation

Low quality and lack of innovation levels in the government school system are leading to declining student enrollment in municipal schools across urban India. Public-private partnership (PPP) models, where a not-for-profit school operator is brought in to manage under-utilized government schools, has great potential. These schools can act as beacons of excellence and spread innovation within the government school system. (Read the full article)
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Creatnet Education

Government schools principals in India work with limited resources and under challenging situations with high expectations from all stakeholders. Heads of government schools do not have access to structured continuous professional development programmes customised for their role/ position in the school. (Read the full article)
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India School Leadership Institute

Government schools principals in India work with limited resources and under challenging situations with high expectations from all stakeholders. Heads of government schools do not have access to structured continuous professional development programmes customised for their role/ position in the school. (Read the full article)
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Saajha

The Right to Education (RTE) 2009 act mandates the formation of School Management Committees (SMCs) which are elected bodies at the school level consisting predominantly of parents along with teachers, local authorities and the headmaster. Recognizing that local communities have the greatest motivation for improving school quality, the policy charges SMCs with monitoring school functioning and with overseeing the utilisation of school grants. Currently, SMC implementation is at a nascent stage and requires greater investment to fulfill its potential. (Read the full article)
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Little Dolphin CP Therapy Centres

At present, China has more than six million patients with cerebral palsy, of which children under 12 years old makes up more than two million. 74.62% of these children are born in economically poor regions of China where proper pre-natal care is lacking. A large number of babies born with cerebral palsy in economically poor regions of China are being abandoned at birth due to severe public stigma and high financial burdens of caring for a CP child over the long term. Base on our research, more than 65% of these children with CP do not receive regular treatment partly due to the lack of effective ways to improve the condition as well as the heavy cost involved in long-term medical care for the condition. Families with a CP child often end up with single income, as at least one parent needs to look after the CP child full time given the high dependency of the child on others for daily living. This often results in comparatively poorer family financial situation than families without a CP child and exacerbate the stress at home leading to other family issues. China Disabled Persons' Federation (CDPF) is the main government entity in charge of people with cerebral palsy. The current policy of CDPF provides subsidies for rehabilitation and surgery costs for children with CP under the age of 7 year old ranging from RMB 10,000 to RMB 48,000 annually per child. There is no government subsidy for children with CP above the age of 7 years old in most second to fourth tier provinces while in the first tier cities like Beijing and Shanghai , government subsidies continue until age 16 years old. Although surgery is an option for children with CP under the age of 5 years old , it has been proven to be ineffective in combating the condition over the long term . Surgery is not recommended for children with CP above 5 years old .In addition to the funding problem , the other more pressing problem is a lack of effective methods to treat CP in older children under the current medical system. (Read the full article)
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The New Heaven Reef Conservation Program (NHRCP)

Coral Reefs cover less than 1% of the ocean floor but support 25% of all marine life. More than 450 million people live within 60 kilometers of coral reefs, with the majority directly or indirectly depending on them for food and income. The beautiful underwater habitats are deteriorating at the devastating rate of 2% per year. If not prevented, 60% of the world's coral reefs could be destroyed over the next 30 years. (Read the full article)
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Waterhope

Lack of access to clean water is rapidly becoming the predominant cause of death on Earth. Over 3.5 million people die each year from preventable water-related disease and it is estimated that the fatal number will rise to 135 million by 2020. In Philippines, more than 13 million people do not have access to improved water sources. Of the 3.2 million reported disease cases and 6000 premature deaths each year, one-sixth of them are due to exposure to water pollution, poor sanitation and insufficient hygiene practices. Everyday, villagers travel up to 6 miles to fetch water, often contaminated, disease-ridden water. By providing these people with close-by, clean water, their standard of living can be improved as the time spent on collecting water can be invested on education, community involvement or work. (Read the full article)
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Aangan Trust

In India, more than 100 000 minors between ages 6 and 18 years are detained in juvenile homes each year. They are either alleged criminals or had been abandoned by their family. There are approximately 800 state-run children homes in India where children stay for an average of 3 years. The conditions in those homes are atrocious, inhumane and prisonlike. In these homes, children often learn fighting to associate with or defend against violent cohabiters and abusive staff. Lack of supervision sometimes lead to minors being exploited by criminals, pimps and peddlers. (Read the full article)
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Mann Deshi(MD)

When men from rural regions in India emigrate to cities for more job opportunities, the women are left to care for the household and hence unable to go to school. Over 75 percent of the women in rural areas live in poverty. Unfortunately, they have limited access to credits, as the commercial banking sector deem servicing them unbeneficial and risky, hence avoids them. If attainable, credits would allow them to develop themselves and their respective regions economically. (Read the full article)
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Tòhe

In Vietnam, underprivileged children are not given the same educational chances as mainstream students and visual arts is frequently excluded from their syllabus due to cost. Although this issue has been confronted before, challenges still exist with untrained teachers and ill-planned curriculum. Art education is crucial as it helps motivate children’s ceativity and to develop their identity and social competencies. (Read the full article)
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One Renewable Energy Enterprise, Inc. (OREE)

As the Philippines is an archipelago, connecting all citizens to the grid would be too costly and difficult to maintain. Electricity prices in the Philippines are one of the highest in Asia, especially in the rural areas. Approximately 3.1 million Filipino households (16% of the population) do not have access to electricity; they use kerosene lamps, which have detrimental effects on the environment and people’s health, as alternatives. (Read the full article)
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Oxfam Enterprising for Development Project

Despite recent growth, Vietnam is a country with continued levels of poverty, particularly for specific marginalized groups in rural areas. In particular, small scale farmers, youth and women suffer from low and unstable income situations. To combat poverty in Vietnam, increasing the net income gains in agricultural production for small scale farmers and creating more job opportunities for young people in rural areas is key. Small and Medium Size Enterprise (SME) development in rural areas targeted at strengthening the position of small scale farmers in the value chain and engaging youth and women could potentially be an answer. However, despite the fact that many new SMEs are established, few manage to survive. Those led by women and/or youth show a lower success rate than others. The main blockages for SME survival and growth is a lack of growth finance, with many SMEs having difficulty accessing bank loans as most of them do not have collaterals as well as long business track records. Additionally, many SMEs lack business knowledge and skills, particularly in the area of governance, financial accounting and marketing. (Read the full article)
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Be The Change Resources, MY Street Interview

Problem statement: Homelessness presents a major social challenge in urban Malaysia. Many among the homeless population do not have a salaried job and must rely on social safety-nets such as soup-kitchens and shelters for subsistence living. There are numerous factors that keep them in the vicious cycle of joblessness and homelessness, such as troubles coping with working life after being homeless for an extended time or the lack of means (phone, transportation, etc.) to interview for a job. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

HOPE Worldwide Kuala Lumpur, HOPE Clinic Apprenticeship

Problem statement: In 2012, youths with a primary education accounted for 12% of the total youth employment in Malaysia. For those without any formal education, their proportion barely reaches 1.6% of total youth employment. These statistics point to challenges that underpriviledged youths in Malaysia face, their lack of socio-economic mobility, and difficulties of breaking out of the circumstances that they grew up in. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Jalan-jalan Gelandangan

Problem statement: According to a newspaper report, about 90% of urban homeless in Malaysia have jobs. Majority of them are employed in laborious, low-level positions such as security, kitchen help or sales. The homeless encounter many challenges that keep them on the streets. Their employment typically does not provide sufficient income and stability to afford permanet shelter. Limited skills also hinder their efforts to find a living wage. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Soroptimist International Petaling Jaya, SEEED JobsforLife

Youth employment presents a pressing issue in Malaysia, with about 10% of the youth labor force unable to find work or achieve financial independence. This is partly due to key knowledge and skills gaps, as unemployed youths often lack access to various life-skills training that can help them land gainful employment. If left unaddressed, this skills gap may contribute towards increasing under-employment in Malaysia, with youths having to settle for work far below their qualification. In the extreme, these issues may give rise to socio-economic marginalization and an increase in social ills. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Foodabox

Food operators prefer to use non-biodegradable food boxes because its economical cost advantages. This business preference has led to increased amounts of carbon emissions emitted into the ozone layer and exacerbated global warming. Another problem Foodabox addresses is the many single mothers in Malaysia who are unemployed and live below the poverty line, with poor standards of living for them and their families. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Rumah Kasih Harmoni Paya Jaras, Teratak Kasih

Disadvantaged, homeless youths in Malaysia often lack strong systems for social support, such as family members who can offer guidance and act as positive role models. The high cost of living also poses additional challenges for these youth, who often have problems just to make ends meet. The possibility of furthering their education and improving themselves can appear as distant priorities. As a result, they can be trapped in a vicious cycle of poverty and even pick up social ills such as crime and drug abuse. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Light House Learning Group, Turbo Charge Learning

Malaysia has over 5 million primary and secondary school students. Unfortunately, many students lack important problem solving skills crucial for a productive work force. Malaysia ranked 39 out of 44 countries in the problem-solving test for 15-year olds on the Programme for International Students Assessment 2012. As such, efforts are needed to improve skills in critical thinking, problem solving, and higher order thinking for children, if the country expects to produce better education results and a more productive work force. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

WOMEN:girls, Kejar Kerja

Malaysia has one of the lowest female workforce participation rate in all of Southeast Asia. Currently there are approximately 150,000 unemployed female youth who have only completed the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia level of (secondary) education. Limited support services and social obstables (like family restrictions) prevent girls from pursuing further education and developing skills for the workforce. A lack of education in turn hampers their ability to find decent jobs and earn an income. These challenges contrain the socio-economic empowerment of women. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Pertubuhan Prihatin Sosial Malaysia, Youthpreneurs!

Malaysian youths face challenges of access to employment. Lack of skills and competency for decent jobs contribute to youth unemployment, especially in disadvantaged communities. Many young people resort to odd jobs that may not provide a living wage. These challenges may push many into poverty and hamper the country’s socio-economic development. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

The Backyard Tour Guide

The high unemployment rate amongst Malaysian youth adversely impacts youth poverty and leads to lower standards of living. Another issue addressed is that though Malaysia boasts multiple natural sites in rural areas, which have immense tourism potential, these sites are typically hidden treasures that tourists are not aware of or do not have access to. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

iHealth Express

The number of chronic disease patients in Taiwan is 8 million, which accounts for one third of the population. Although there are 25 medical centres across Taiwan, 80% of them are within the three big cities. This makes it difficult for people, in particular the chronically-ill, the elderly or disabled, who live in more remote areas. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Learn Education

Education, in particular for Math and Science of young generation in Thailand, 124,611 students dropout each year and are vulnerable to degenerative lifestyles. Moreover, the results of O-NET (national examination) in math and sciences fall significantly below national standards, dropping another 98,283 students after 9th grade, the rest continue high school where the dropout rates increase over 200%. One of the most fundamental foundations in student academic and life skill development are the lack of quality and quantity of teachers particularly in the subjects of Mathematics and Sciences, the number of which is 66,094 less than what Thailand needs. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Apne Aap Women Worldwide

Each year, thousands of girls are exploited into sex trafficking, some as young as 9 years old. Girls are usually abducted and sold, then expected to work off their purchase money. Beaten whenever they resist, they do not have a choice. Nepal, which borders India, is one of the poorest Asian country. That is where agents go hunting for girls and transport them over the border to be sold as modern-day sex slaves. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Iswar Sankalpa

Homelessness is a condition not unknown to Kolkata, where the thousands of migrants are unable to find a home, thus resort to staying on the streets. Amongst these homeless people are the nowhere people – the homeless with psychosocial disabilities, lost to the world. They have been rendered homeless due to their mental conditions; they are the unwashed, stranded ppl on the road, isolated from everyone else. They often endure severe mental distress and physical abuse, living in railway stations, bus stands and on street corners. It is estimated that there are over 400,000 homeless persons with psychosocial disabilities in India, and amongst these, over 90% have diagnosable and treatable mental health conditions. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

National Institute of Women, Child and Youth Development

Approximately 70,000 children arrive on station platforms in India every year. These children are runaways from all over India, mostly escaping from abuse at home or to find work. The prospect of better opportunities propels these children to leave their homes and families behind to venture into unknown territory. Only when they arrive at the railways do they realize that abuse is much more abundant on the platforms. Railway children easily fall prey to drugs under the influence of peers. They get money by begging, stealing and doing menial jobs, such as sweeping trains and platforms, but 70% of that money goes to the purchase of drugs. Sometimes, the bigger boys steal their money and beat them up. Child traffickers are often prowling the platforms for children to kidnap, exploit for prostitution, organ donations or employment. Girl runaways spend much less time on the platform than boys, as they are more likely to be immediately recruited into prostitution and other forms of exploitation. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Janvikas Samajik Sansth

The Marathwada region in Maharashtra is a major hub for the sugar cane industry. Though advanced mechanized methods of sugar cane cutting are available, sugar cane cutting remains labor-intensive. Entire families would migrate to live on sugar cane farms for several months to work, often underpaid, jobs. There they live in makeshift shanties, with minimal protection from harsh weather. Living conditions at the shanties are sloppy and unhygienic, with no toilets or sources of drinking water, allowing disorder and disease to be rampant. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Gramin Mahila Vikas and Samaj Vikas Sanstha

As Marathwada is a Feudal society, patriarchy is still prominent. Dalits, the lowest in the social strata, and women are mistreated regularly, and due to traditional beliefs are marginalized both socially and economically. One-fifth of Marathwada’s population consists of dalits and an estimate of over 85% of dalits work in the agricultural sector as wage labourers, often underpaid. In most villages in Marathwada almost 10 percent of the population is made up of single women. The social systems permit men to marry more than once, making wife abandonment widespread. Abandoned wives are not accepted back into their maiden family but need to support their children, resulting in them becoming destitute and depressed. Those not deserted are frequently beaten, especially in the summer months when men working as sugar cane cutters do not have work. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Wildlife Crimes Unit

Hunting and wildlife trading is causing immense damage to the rich biodiversity in Indonesia. According to the wildlife trade monitoring network called TRAFFIC, turtles and pangolins (a type of scaly anteater) are exported on a weekly basis and about 1.5 million wild-caught birds are sold in a bird market every year in Java. Skins and bones of many protected tiger species are traded from Sumatra to China, where they are sold as souvenirs, talismans, and ingredients for traditional medicines. Today, fewer than 3,500 of these big cats remain in the wild. While there are laws in Indonesia to control wildlife hunting and trade, enforcement is weak. In addition, many of its protected areas lack adequate resources and staff to prevent poachers from entering. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

Clean Air Network

Clean Air Network is a Hong Kong-based independent NGO that encourages the public to speak out on the issue of air pollution. They are a network bringing together and amplifying the voices of individuals, groups and organizations to urge the Government to act immediately to clean the air by focusing the public’s attention on long term health risks. CAN has become the principal voice for clean air since its inception in 2009. Local media turns to CAN for them to share their perspective when reporting on the city’s chronic air pollution. CAN is widely known for its civic action, education programs, as well as timely analysis of government policies. It is also a key information resource for air pollution, public health and policy in Hong Kong, with an active website and frequent social media updates. A combined audience of 38,000 members subscribe to CAN’s various social media platforms. According to the Hedley Index, air pollution is causing more than 3000 premature deaths on average per year. In 2014, it also resulted in 174,926 hospital stays, 4.3 million doctor visits and the economic loss reached 33 billion HKD. Numerous reports also indicated that talents left HK due to the air situation. Failure to improve air in Hong Kong will not only inflict adverse health impacts on the people, but also hurt the city’s competitiveness. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

RunOurCity Foundation Limited

RunOurCity Foundation is a Hong Kong-based registered charity that aims to positively impact the lives of young people through running. The Youth.ROC program works with teenagers, aged 15 or above, to improve their coordination, physical strength and stamina for a stronger body and boost their self-confidence, concentration and perseverance during the challenging transition from childhood to adulthood. (Read the full article)
Supported by: 2

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